Emergency Response Training - A fire on boad

This article is part two of a three part series which follows the Rosemont Yacht Management Emergency Response Team in their monthly and annual training program.

In last month’s article we discussed the requirements and regulations surrounding Emergency Response Training both on board and in the Management offices. This month saw the Rosemont Emergency Response Team carry out an annual training exercise with one of their motor yachts which was berthed in Italy.

The scenario being put to the test was a fire on board with a medical emergency.

The DPA, Shelley Dowie received the initial call from the captain, informing her that the vessel had a fire on board in the galley and one crew member was missing. It was agreed that the captain would call back with an update fifteen minutes later. At this stage is it crucial to gather essential information such as vessel position, persons on board, any medical issues and immediate assistance required to enable the team to provide effective support to the vessel. At this stage it is also very important to establish clear lines of communications and set parameters for further exchanges.

During any emergency, the DPA is tasked solely with communicating with the vessel and relaying this information back to the Response Team, this means the vessel has one point of contact and a dedicated line to the office.

After the initial call from the captain the DPA immediately called the Deputy DPA whose job it is to gather the Rosemont Emergency Response Team in the dedicated Monaco Emergency Response offices and brief the team.

During the initial stages of any emergency situation, organisation is key. Voice and video communications are established between the UK and Monaco office, and the vessel. Then vessel and crew information is gathered and essential notifications are sent out to the relevant parties. Each member of the Emergency Response Team has a dedicated checklist detailing their actions and priorities during an emergency which are followed in a systematic manner, ensuring that all tasks are completed.  

The Response Team are in constant contact with the Port Authorities, Classification Society, Flag State, Emergency Services, Insurers and other parties as needed, meaning the captain and crew can focus on dealing with the situation on board and do not have any further distractions. Rosemont also have a dedicated trained personnel for dealing with any media enquiries relating to the emergency.
The key to providing effective support to any vessel in danger is preparedness and training. By carrying out frequent exercises and drills both on board and in the management offices, means that should an incident occur, the situation can be dealt with in an efficient and effective manner.
 

Look out for next month’s newsletter where we discuss lessons learned from the Emergency Response training exercises, the concluding part of this three part article.
 
For more information on the Rosemont Yacht Management Team please contact;
Shelley Dowie
safety@rosemont-yacht.com


22/12/2017